Official: Microsoft Killing Xbox One DRM

June 19, 2013 | By | 4 Comments

UPDATE 2: It’s officially official, as the link in the first story update below now leads to a statement from Microsoft’s Don Mattrick. Here it is in its entirety:

“Last week at E3, the excitement, creativity and future of our industry was on display for a global audience.

For us, the future comes in the form of Xbox One, a system designed to be the best place to play games this year and for many years to come. As is our heritage with Xbox, we designed a system that could take full advantage of advances in technology in order to deliver a breakthrough in game play and entertainment. We imagined a new set of benefits such as easier roaming, family sharing, and new ways to try and buy games. We believe in the benefits of a connected, digital future.

Since unveiling our plans for Xbox One, my team and I have heard directly from many of you, read your comments and listened to your feedback. I would like to take the opportunity today to thank you for your assistance in helping us to reshape the future of Xbox One.

You told us how much you loved the flexibility you have today with games delivered on disc. The ability to lend, share, and resell these games at your discretion is of incredible importance to you. Also important to you is the freedom to play offline, for any length of time, anywhere in the world.

So, today I am announcing the following changes to Xbox One and how you can play, share, lend, and resell your games exactly as you do today on Xbox 360. Here is what that means:

  • An internet connection will not be required to play offline Xbox One games– After a one-time system set-up with a new Xbox One, you can play any disc based game without ever connecting online again. There is no 24 hour connection requirement and you can take your Xbox One anywhere you want and play your games, just like on Xbox 360.
  • Trade-in, lend, resell, gift, and rent disc based games just like you do today – There will be no limitations to using and sharing games, it will work just as it does today on Xbox 360.

In addition to buying a disc from a retailer, you can also download games from Xbox Live on day of release. If you choose to download your games, you will be able to play them offline just like you do today. Xbox One games will be playable on any Xbox One console — there will be no regional restrictions.

These changes will impact some of the scenarios we previously announced for Xbox One. The sharing of games will work as it does today, you will simply share the disc. Downloaded titles cannot be shared or resold. Also, similar to today, playing disc based games will require that the disc be in the tray.

We appreciate your passion, support and willingness to challenge the assumptions of digital licensing and connectivity. While we believe that the majority of people will play games online and access the cloud for both games and entertainment, we will give consumers the choice of both physical and digital content. We have listened and we have heard loud and clear from your feedback that you want the best of both worlds.

Thank you again for your candid feedback. Our team remains committed to listening, taking feedback and delivering a great product for you later this year.”

UPDATE 1: Microsoft has posted the following on the official Xbox One DRM FAQ:

“Update on June 19, 2013: As a result of feedback from the Xbox community, we have changed certain policies for Xbox One reflected in this blog. Some of this information is no longer accurate — please check here for the latest.

As of now, the link leads to a dead page, but the reversal is all but confirmed. The original story follows.

ORIGINAL: It seems that Giant Bomb has picked up one hell of a scoop today, as the outlet’s sources are telling them that Microsoft will be pulling a full 180-degree turn on the Xbox One’s DRM policies that have caused the company a PR headache since the console’s reveal.

The sources say that the reversal means the following:

  • No more always online requirement
  • The console no longer has to check in every 24 hours
  • All game discs will work on Xbox One as they do on Xbox 360
  • Authentication is no longer necessary
  • An Internet connection is only required when initially setting up the console
  • All downloaded games will function the same when online or offline
  • No additional restrictions on trading games or loaning discs
  • Region locks have been dropped

Just last week, Sony shellacked Microsoft at their E3 press conference by announcing that the PlayStation 4 would maintain the status quo on used games, allowing its users to freely share their games and play them offline. Giant Bomb’s sources also say that Microsoft will say they’ve “been listening closely to consumer feedback” when they officially announce the shift in policy.

If this turns out to be true — and Giant Bomb’s sources are rock-solid — then it’s a tremendous victory for consumer rights. The Xbox One touted a strong library at E3, and it’d be a shame for anyone to be locked out of it for any reason at all.

Source: Giant Bomb

  • http://avangionq.stumbleupon.com/ AvangionQ

    Good decisions, though I’m not sure if they did so because the PS4 would crush them or that they actually listened to the gamer backlash … anyway, now I can consider buying the new xbox again …

    • Andrew Arnold

      Make no mistake, it was because of the PS4- Not that the PS4 is a better system or anything, it was just a viable option to not get screwed over by MS, and they couldn’t afford that. If there was no PS4, they wouldn’t have changed their position.

  • Manuel Granados

    So I guess the whole “it’s not us it’s the developers” was just a lie? Good start xbox, lying to your costumers and then changing everything up to not support the lie.

    • Shannon L Gillece

      Who cares…..we got what we wanted.


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